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« The stethoscope vs. the microscope: Solving the shortage of veterinary scientists | Main | Los Angeles area pet owners evacuating with their animals »

01 September 2009

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EmilyS

great article! but, oy, the comments.........

Christie Keith

I'm simply not reading the comments. I know JUST what they say.

Becky C.

Great great article ... and having had the pleasure of adopting a rescued greyhound from Barbara no less, and then many years later after the loss of our great hound, adopting a pit bull from Grass Valley shelter, and learning the in's and out's of both breeds was a fabulous experience.



I loved the greyhound dearly, he was a great and wonderful dog, couch potato when not flat out, and gentle as a lamb except with food left on counters.



Daphne, my current heart dog, is big, strong, but equally as lovable if a tad more stubborn but much smarter (sorry to the g-hounds). Both breeds are different as night and day but they are both fantastic dogs. My next dog will probably be a pit bull but that's many years (and probably many fosters) down the road!

Animals Away

It is unfortunate that dogs have to be euthanized simply because they can't be placed into a home. Pits and greyhounds are such loving animals.

Maria Shanley

I've known a number of sighthounds that I just fell in love with - sweet, gentle, funny goofballs. I cried almost as much as his owner when a 5-year-old Irish wolfhound who was our patient lost his battle with pulmonary disease. My only concern with adopting a greyhound here in Wyoming is how a smooth-coated dog with so little body fat would handle going outside even briefly in our -40 degree windchill winters. All our present dogs have plenty of haircoat. Anyone have any experience with greyhounds in Northern tier climates?

Erich Riesenberg

I don't know what breed one of mine is, but she is fast, runs around the otherwise fast pointer. She is also very thin, reminds me of a Greyound. We put an insulated coat on, it is similar to a horse blanket, and running around outside in freezing winter is still fun for her.

Erich Riesenberg

Des Moines is considering a pit ban. My only response is the Vick dogs. They were evaluated, a few killed, the rest rehabbed. The surviving ones seem to be doing great. If testing works, why not use it instead of trying to divine breed and assuming all of a breed are bad? It doesn't make sense.

Anne T

Maria, there are many, many greyhound practical coat designers on Teh Webs, and all kinds of styles and prices. The Northern Tier of states has plenty of short coated sighthounds in it. To see what I mean, here's a link to one of my favorite greyhound rescues, Greyhound Placement Service of New Hampshire.

http://www.gpstopdog.com/

Check out the Greyhound Goodies page. Ot scope out this Forum:

http://forum.greytalk.com/index.php?act=home

Winter walks ( don't ever let a greyhound off lead unless they're in an enclosed area) might require a warm coat and boots or pad wax to protect their feet from cold & road salt. But don't let your climate stop you from considering adopting one of these wonderful dogs. Or even better, adopt a Greyt & a pibble! The pibble will need a winter coat, too! lol.

katie

*g* One of my shelter pits wears a coat 24/7 in the winter because she's nearly nekkid, very trim, and wimpy. I figure a greyhound in a coat would fit in well.

Alex V.

Great article, Christie! Comments, mind-numbing as usual.... I seriously think schools should add a mandatory animal behavior class in middle school and/or high school. Maybe people would be slightly less 'tarded when it comes to animals. And maybe that's just wishful thinking.....

Janine

Indeed both breeds can be difficult if you have the wrong expectations going into it. You need to be willing to be the leader of your pack and provide a balance of exercise, discipline, and affection. Treat them as a dog first and then as a friend. So many times the human/dog relationship starts off wrong and escalates. The dog and the owner become unhappy and the dog ends up back at the shelter and is very unlikely to be adopted out again. Fortunately, there are special people in the world who are willing to share their home with unwanted breeds, and to them, I am very grateful. You can meet several of these wonderful home town heroes at: www.vetdex.com

Janine

Indeed both breeds can be difficult if you have the wrong expectations going into it. You need to be willing to be the leader of your pack and provide a balance of excercise, discipline, and affection. Treat them as a dog first and then as a friend. So many times the human/dog relationship starts off wrong and escalates. The dog and the owner become unhappy and they end up back at the shelter and are very unlikely to make it back out. Fortunately, there are many people in the world who are willing to share their home with unwanted breeds such as this, and to them, I am very grateful. You can meet several of these wonderful home town heroes at: www.vetdex.com

Donna

Thanks so much Christie. And how convenient -- The commenters were so gracious to demonstrate why emotional armor is one of the requirements of loving a dog that looks like a pit bull.

straybaby

Maria, there are a few greys in my 'hood, along with other slender and not so slender short/thin haired breeds. We just slap the coats on ;) When the streets are covered in ice and the windchill is below zero, my slender Dal (mix?) just wants to do her biz and go in, as do most dogs and owners here. You learn to find potty spots blocked from the wind to direct the dogs to, lol!~ Mine's not into booties, but many of the dogs around me wear them. Mine will wear a scarf or the jackets I made that go up her neck and head more. Now granted, we don't get -40, but we have had -15 to -20. I treat anything below 10 the same. Quick out and back in. Unless of course the Dot feels like doing a few zoomies and then back in for a nap. I just stick close to home. AKA, on the same block! I do the same for heat. Let the dog let me know what she wants, but know that I am the one with reasoning abilities ;)



One thing I do in winter is adjust diet and make sure she's getting enough oils to keep her skin/coat from drying out too much. My girl eats more in the winter. Extra fuel to keep warm :)



as far as pits/greys and adopting goes, I wish the misconception that they aren't apt dogs would just go away. Same with other "non-apartment dog" breeds. There are at least a dozen "non-apartment dog" Dals living around me and many other "non-apartment dog" breeds. And this goes to rescues also. "Must have fenced yard" etc rules. "Must be willing to walk/exercise dog" should be the thought process. Not a fenced yard.

JLS

I know one thing. Everytime I see a pitty behind a fence here, I want to take it home and love it. I have spent many minutes on my rear end making aquaintences with the many Pit Bulls in my neighborhood behind fences, owners thinking they must have this dog to feel safe. I have had the meanest toughest bullys come to love me when they smelled my scent on the walks that I take daily. Its my mantra to make pals. I feel now that I have a bit of a calling. Befriend dogs behine fences. Most of my neighbors use the dogs, but do not love these beautiful animals. I know them differently from out here. But are aware of their potence. I have come to know them with respect and love.



nuts, yes I am and glad for it.

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