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« Girl meets shoe store | Main | Proposed federal law: Prove your pets are safe, or we ' ll ban them »

07 April 2009

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Christie Keith

Kate, I think everyone agrees it will take work. And it's not something you just do and then you're done, either. It's ongoing work.



But I agree with you that it's worth the effort. :)

Kate

The world is in a state of chaos and people are to worried about their own basic survival right now. It certainly doesn't help anyone when the "experts" suggest a no kill policy isn't worth the effort, won't work, or will cost to much.



There's been progress but let's not delude ourselves it's going to take time, determination, and effort for the cause to flourish.

Christie Keith

I’m constantly told by the head of Animal Services here in Miami-Dade County that our area is “different.” That we don’t have the cultural outlook other areas enjoy to make a change towards no-kill.



What's ironic is that EVERYONE says "It won't work here" at first. Then they do it.



And then someone else says, well, it worked there but it won't work here!



Until it does.

Rosemary

We just have to keep on hammering home that "no-kill" doesn't mean keeping suffering animals alive when they ought to be euthanised but is about normal, adoptable animals and there's no reason why we should think it's necessary to kill them to control population.

Dr. Patty Khuly

I'm constantly told by the head of Animal Services here in Miami-Dade County that our area is "different." That we don't have the cultural outlook other areas enjoy to make a change towards no-kill.



In some ways I believe this dedicated veterinarian. I know she wants what I do. The difference is that I have faith that it can be done. She doesn't.



We just voted for a $600 MM ballpark. Imagine the good that could do for the public life of a city that loves its dogs as much as any does. What it takes is commitment--and faith, of course.

Sue Cosby

I don't believe that anyone has ever achieved greatness by beginning with the belief that it couldn't be done.

mary

I heard on PBS there will be a series by Jacques Cousteau's son - sorry can't remember his name - anyway he said when we protect the oceans we protect ourselves - I believe when we protect animals we are also protecting ourselves - we are expanding our capacity of compassion -

Christie Keith

Yes, the subject of getting more pet-friendly housing was addressed several times, not notably by Betsy Saul of Petfinder.com.



I proposed not long ago, half seriously and half joking, that instead of working so freaking hard on legally mandating sterilization of people's pets, they instead started mandating that landlords and HOAs could no longer ban pets.



THAT would empty the shelters, and reduce intake, faster and to a greater degree than forcing the small percentage of people in this country who still have intact animals to alter them.



Of course, laws to force me to alter my pets against my will and without regard for my ownership of them, or my wishes about my own animals, or the fact that they are living creatures who could potentially be harmed by this forced surgery don't seem to bother anyone half as much as the idea of telling a landlord or HOA what they can do with their property.



And yet -- soiled carpet can be replaced. Chewed up doorjambs, the same.



This country has its head up its butt about this issue.

Lis

I proposed not long ago, half seriously and half joking, that instead of working so freaking hard on legally mandating sterilization of people’s pets, they instead started mandating that landlords and HOAs could no longer ban pets



To get anything other than cats and small dogs into housing that way, you also have to mandate a change to insurance company policies. Speaking as a landlord who IS a responsible dog owner, and whose insurance company is graciously indifferent to the presence of dogs weighing twenty pounds or less.



Had a lovely prospective tenant last year, who would have had her daughter's lovely, sweet, well-behaved Siberian husky three days out of seven. I wanted so bad to rent to her...

JenniferJ

Our rescue will help people keep dogs. Including foster care when there is space and food or arranging some vet care. But a lot of people on the bubble are scared. No, actually they are terrified of the next one, two, six twelve months. Some will accept help. Others are truly at a point where they will lessen the weight of responsibility anyway they can. At that stage, seeking out a rescue or at least bringing the animal to a shelter is sure better than a trip to nowhere and outta the car or left in an abandoned home.



If folks have already reached that saturation point, they won't keep the dog. If we can get the to ask for help and have them see that there are options other than giving up their pet before they hit that stage, it would make a great difference I think.

Dorene

I was listening to "All Things Considered" on NPR yesterday as I was potting up my seedlings. They had a heart-rending story about a construction worker who had two dogs (both around 7?) that he had raised from pups. He had to give up his dogs because he lost his job, and thus his house and he couldn't find anywhere that would take both him and his dogs.



This "foreclosure pet upswell" has got to end. Why are we re-homing the dogs of a responsible dog owner? How can we change the laws (dog has to get a Canine Good Citizen certificate or something, cats should just be allowed) so that responsible pet owners CAN TAKE THEIR PETS WITH THEM?



How do we encourage not only responsible pet ownership, but LANDLORDS that reward responsible pet ownership, whether that be government transitional housing OR private landlords?



Christie -- did anyone at the conference talk about how we encourage landlords to allow pet ownership?



As long as we're changing the world, let's change the rental landscape so that responsible people can keep their pets.

PeonInChief

Historically, landlords prohibited pets because pets often came with children but, since it's illegal to discriminate against children, prohibiting pets would keep the kids out. As this has become less true--many people have pets because they don't have children (the furbaby phenomenon)--more landlords accept pets. But landlords frequently use pet prohibitions to discriminate for other prohibited reasons (race, for instance) by permitting white tenants to bring pets while prohibiting African American households from having pets--thus sending the undesired tenants searching elsewhere for housing.



Unfortunately it's unadulterated cowardice on the part of the HSUS and local SPCA groups. They don't want to confront landlords who have political/economic power, so they put the burden on the powerless.

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