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« Statewide no kill ballot measure proposed in California | Main | The amazing flying deerhound »

05 October 2007

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Gina Spadafori

I think that's the point Nancy Campbell is making. That the woman was NOT a responsible breeder. Nancy knows the difference, trust me!

The OTHER Pat

Happy to hear that! Just read what she wrote wrong, I guess!

The OTHER Pat

The article says "I have nothing against responsible breeding and breeders."



Huh? The RESPONSIBLE breeders don't view their dogs as nothing but 4-legged ATMs. It's all the OTHER kinds of breeders that do.



When will people stop lumping them all together . . . . .

Dr. Patty Khuly

Ahhh, the four-legged ATM. I'm familiar with the piggy bank uterus, too. Here's my take:

http://www.dolittler.com/index.cfm/2006/11/6/pet.vet.dog.cat.vs.11.6.06

thomas

One day a freind and I had been to a rescueers house. She had several rescues from puppy mills. One was a beautiful little blonde cocker spaniel , she was about nine years old. As a young dog she had her rear leg run over by an ironed wheeled tracor.The Mennonite puppy mill operator had decided that he would not spend the money to have her leg fixed. She has learned to live with her handicap and drags her rear leg. The rescue person had her to a vet and a decision was made that because of her age not to amputate her leg.



When we left we drove around the corner and saw a puppy mill we stopped and asked if they had any dogs they did not want . There were several cockers running loose. We were not allowed in the barn or house. We saw one little blonde cocker laying under a tree and one of her eyes looked infected , it was cone shaped and protruded from the socket. we asked about her as she looked like she was in pain. The woman told us they had decided not to do surgery or treat her eye. The woman told us to come back the next day and they would let us have 3 dogs. When we arrived the next day we were told they had decided not to let us take the little girl with the eye problems. I asked if they would reconsider if I promised to take her to my vet. The woman talked to her husband and they agreed to let us have Patsy. The woman also told us patsy had stopped having big litters and her last litters only had 3 pups. We left with 3 dogs. We called my vet as we drove and he had us bring Patsy in an hour later. He said her eye had to be removed immediately, but he couldn't operate until she was cleaned up. She was a matted mess of poop . urine, burdocks and would need a bath. We contacted a groomer and had her cleaned the next day. She had her first eye removed the next day. We tried to save the other eye but were unable to. So a couple of months later that eye was removed. Patsy started in obedience , she is now a canine good citizen and volunteers in a nursing home . She has learned more commands than I ever imagined she could.One of the amazing things about Patsy is he doesn't hate people for what they did to her, she forgives and loves people. She doesn't just survive, she thrives!

The other 2 dogs went to a no kill shelter , were groomed ,spayed, neutured and went into forever homes.

perkysmom

I live in an average neighborhood and even though we have a city ordinance limiting houses to just 2 dogs, there are people in the neighborhood - and not by any stretch of the imagination can you call them "breeders" - who keep dogs to reproduce and sell. Why would you buy one from someone who just wants to make a few hundred extra dollars and knows nothing about "breeding"? And what about these crazy mixed breed dogs like Puggles and Labradoodle? We used to call them mutts.

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